lamdha books -
Catalogue of books on the Poles

Click on the small images at right to see a larger picture

42933
Ayres, Philip
Mawson: A Life
Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 1999.
Hardcover, octavo; white papered boards with gilt spine titling; 321pp., colour and monochrome illustrations. No.27 in second numbered series of publications. Minor faint spotting to upper text block and board edges; mild rubbing to lower board edges; small mark on side text block edge. Otherwise near fine in like dustwrapper now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. In the heroic age of polar exploration, Sir Douglas Mawson stands in the first rank. His Antarctic expeditions of 1911-14 and 1929-31 resulted in Australia claiming forty per cent of the sixth continent. The sole survivor of an epic 300-mile trek, Mawson was also a scientist of national stature. In this book Philip Ayres illuminates Mawson's many achievements.
Click here to order

$35
41444
Bickel, Lennard
In Search of Frank Hurley
Macmillan, South Melbourne, 1980.
Quarto hardcover; red boards with white spine titling, illustrated endpapers; 140pp, mainly monochrome illustrations. Inscription. A few small scrapes to board edges and corners; mild spotting to upper text block edges. Red illustrated dustwrapper with wear to edges and tiny tear on lower spine extremity. Very good and professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Frank Hurley's first chance came when Douglas Mawson, impressed by his energy and 'initiative' appointed him official photographer to Australia's first Antarctic expedition. He was not yet thirty years old when he defied icy winds and temperatures of 70 below to capture the classic scenes in Antarctic exploration - the dying ship Endurance crushed in the frozen pack ice of the Weddell Sea. These images alone would have earned him distinction. Five more visits south would follow, squeezed into a relentless schedule which over 58 years took him to two world wars as official photographer, involved him in pioneer aviation and near-death in a crash, and the making of the first feature films in Australia as well as a string of documentaries and drama features in London, New York and Hollywood. This is a magnificently illustrated record of a man whose legendary courage, humour and insistence on artistic perfection have earned him a place in Australian and British history.
Click here to order

$30
63213
Bickel, Lennard
Shackleton's Forgotten Argonauts
Macmillan, Melbourne, Vic., Australia, 1982
Octavo; hardcover, 229pp., with monochrome plates. Owner's name on front endpaper; otherwise a near fine copy in like dustwrapper. Shackleton's Antarctic adventures are rightly heralded as gruelling and heroic; however, many forget that there were two sides to his mission: while he attempted to trek from the Weddell Sea, 2,000 miles across the southern continent, a support team was moving towards him from the Ross Sea on the other side of the landmass, laying supply depots in advance of the trekkers. When Shackleton was forced to turn back after his ship was crushed and his supplies lost, the support team faced similar difficulties of an equal or even greater magnitude. Their ship sank; they became snowbound, forced to eke out limited supplies through two bitter Antarctic winters; all suffered incredible hardship and some of them died. Nevertheless, they fulfilled their mission, setting supply depots for a party of explorers who never arrived. Perhaps it is this sense of anticlimax which has relegated these adventurers to a lesser status in polar history; Lennard Bickel redresses the balance in this grim narrative.
Click here to order

$35
206564
Bowden, Tim
The Silence Calling - Australians in Antarctica 1947-97 The Anare Jubilee History
Allen & Unwin, St Leonards NSW, 1997.
Quarto; hardcover, with gilt spine titling; 593pp., with a monochrome frontispiece, 32pp. of colour plates and many monochrome illustrations. Minor wear; spine heel softened. Dustwrapper mildly rubbed and edgeworn; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good.
Click here to order

$40
201396
Bowden, Tim
The Silence Calling - signed copy Australians in Antarctica 1947-97: The Anare Jubilee History
Allen & Unwin, St Leonards NSW, 1997.
Small quarto; hardcover, with gilt spine titling; 593pp., with many colour plates and monochrome illustrations. Minor wear; signed in ink by the author. Mild rubbing to dustwrapper; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Near fine.
Click here to order

$70
207243
Bown, Stephen R.
White Eskimo Knud Rasmussen's Fearless Journey into the Heart of the Arctic
Da Capo Press/Perseus Books Group, Boston MA, 2015.
Octavo; hardcover, with decorative endpapers; 341pp., with maps, 16pp. of monochrome plates and many monochrome decorations. Dustwrapper. Remainder. New. Among the explorers made famous for revealing hitherto impenetrable cultures - T. E. Lawrence and Wilfred Thesiger in the Middle East, Richard Burton in Africa - Knud Rasmussen stands out not only for his physical bravery but also for the beauty of his writing. Part Danish, part Inuit, Rasmussen made a courageous three-year journey by dog sled from Greenland to Alaska to reveal the common origins of all circumpolar peoples.
Click here to order

$22
213036
Brown, Ian (Peter Meredith, ed.)
Extreme South - signed Struggle and triumph of the first Australian team to the Pole
Australian Geographic Pty. Ltd., Terrey Hills NSW, 1999.
Royal octavo; hardcover, full cloth with silver-gilt spine titles; 256pp. with many full-colour illustrations. Minor wear; signed by the author in ink to the half-title page. Dustwrapper lightly sunned along the spine panel. Very good.
Click here to order

$25
95294
Bruemmer, Fred, et al. (Dr. William E. Taylor Jr., ed.)
The Arctic World
Key Porter Books Ltd./Portland House/Dilithium Press Ltd., New York NY, 1989.
Quarto; hardcover, with silver-gilt spine titles; 256pp., with many full-colour and monochrome illustrations. Mild wear; some marks to the rear endpapers. Dustwrapper is mildly rubbed and edgeworn; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good to near fine.
Click here to order

$30
58473
Fletcher, Harold
Antarctic Days with Mawson A Personal Account of the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929-31
Angus & Robertson, Sydney, 1984.
Hardcover, octavo; gray boards with white spine titling, map endpapers; 313pp., monochrome plates. Mild wear to lower board edges and corners; upper text block edges lightly toned and spotted. Very good in like dustwrapper.
Click here to order

$35
216862
Gallo, Nina
Australian Geographic: Antarctica: signed
Australian Geographic, Sydney, 2020.
Landscape quarto hardcover; illustrated boards and endpapers; 128pp., colour plates. Inscribed in ink to owners. Minor wear only; near fine.
Click here to order

$24
63268
Hall, Lincoln (Jonathan Chester, illus.)
The Loneliest Mountain The Dramatic Story of the First Expedition to Climb Mt. Minto, Antarctica
Simon & Schuster Australia, Brookvale NSW, 1989.
Quarto; hardcover; 232pp., with many full-colour illustrations. Mild wear; spine heel lightly softened; mild dusting to the text block top edge; mild insect damage to the top corner of the upper board; previous owner's name in ink to the flyleaf. Dustwrapper lightly rubbed and edgeworn; spotted on the verso; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good. The Loneliest Mountain is an enthralling account of the courage and triumph of six intrepid individuals who embark on an epic journey to and across 'the last wilderness on earth'. In 1988 a party of six Australian mountaineers set sail for Mount Minto the tallest mountain into the Admiralty Range 150 kilometres deep in the Antarctic Interior. Plagued by disasters that lost them weeks of time, threatened with being trapped in the frozen Ross Sea, but filming all the while, the six pushed on till they reached their goal. A blizzard prevented their first attempt at the climb, with only one day's food remaining, they tried again and succeeded. But then they had to get back to the ship...
Click here to order

$30
99228
Huntford, Roland (intro.)
The Shackleton Voyages: A Pictorial Anthology of the Polar Explorer and Edwardian Hero
Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 2002.
Small square quarto hardcover; blue boards with silver gilt spine titling and decorated endpapers; 287pp., colour, monochrome and monochrome illustrations. Near fine in like dustwrapper. Shackleton's restless, independent spirit surfaced early and his wit and courage captivated and inspired final backers as well as his 'men' during the bleakest of moments. When he lost the race to the South Pole, first to the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen in 1911 and then to his arch rival Captain Scott in 1912, he set his sights on crossing Antarctica. Once again he failed, but he turned disaster into success by returning with all he men under his command alive. After a couple of years of slavish lecturing and writing to pay off his debts in the downbeat post-war years, he raised the funds and enthusiasm for a final expedition (known as the Quest expedition, after the ship used). A romantic to the end, as Quest reached South Georgia, he died of a heart attack, aged only forty seven. Shackleton never forgave Scott for invaliding him home after their attempt to reach the South Pole in 1902-3, in part his anger was the driving force behind Shackleton's repeated expeditions to Antarctica. He proved he could endure severe climates and wild, inhospitable terrain, but above all he displayed an exceptional talent for leadership and a fanatical determination which led him, as he put it 'to go on going till one day I shall not come back'.
Click here to order

$35
214780
Klover, Geir O. (ed.)
Cold Recall Roald Amundsen's Reflections from the South Pole
The Fram Museum, Oslo Norway, 2011.
Quarto; paperback; 132pp., with many monochrome and full-colour illustrations. Mild wear; covers rubbed and edgeworn. Very good. Combines the complete texts of Amundsen's lectures about his expedition to the South Pole with the original hand-coloured slides he used to illustrte his lectures.
Click here to order

$20
58472
Law, Phillip
Antarctic Odyssey
Heinemann, Richmond Vic., Australia, 1983.
Octavo; hardcover; blue boards with silver gilt spine titling; 284pp., colour and monochrome plates, map endpapers. Lightly toned and spotted upper text block edge. Black illustrated dustwrapper mildly rubbed now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good. In 1954, Phillip Law led an expedition to the Antarctic to establish a base there for the purposes of scientific research. This is the record of that expedition and covers all aspects of the planning and building of Australia's Mawson Station. Law reveals in unflinching detail the stresses and successes of the mission, covering the high points and lows of the endeavour: through it all the presence of Antarctica as a character in and of itself, colours the narrative, at times enemy, sometimes friend, and always strange and wonderful.
Click here to order

$30
85118
Lubbock, Basil
The Arctic Whalers
Brown, Son & Ferguson, Glasgow, 1968.
Reprint. Quarto hardcover; blue boards with gilt spine titling and upper board blind-stamped titling; blue map endpapers; 483pp., monochrome frontispiece, plates and illustrations. Minor wear; mildly toned text block edges with a few faint spots on upper edges; lightly rubbed white illustrated dustwrapper with a few tiny marks and minimal wear to edges. Near fine otherwise and professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. 'I had intended when planning this work to make it a complete history of all British whalers, both in the Arctic and in the South Seas, but so great has been the ground to be covered that I have been forced to leave out the South Sea side of British whaling... The day of the Arctic whaleman, known amongst seamen as the Greenlander, and considered the toughest specimen of all the men who followed the sea for a living, has long since passed, but his memory deserves to be preserved, and I feel sure that the reader of this book will find his admiration roused for as gallant a seafarer as ever trod the planks of a stout ship.' - Basil Lubbock
Click here to order

$70
92134
McGoogan, Ken
Ancient Mariner - The Amazing Adventures of Samuel Hearne The Englishman Who Walked to the Arctic Ocean
Bantam Press, London, 2004.
Octavo hardcover; red boards with gilt spine titling, endpaper maps; 333pp., monochrome illustrations. Minor wear; browned and spotted text block and page edges. Very good to near fine in like dustwrapper now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. In 1757, Samuel Hearne joined the Royal Navy at the age of twelve and began a tumultuous life of exploration and adventure. He served during the Seven Years War under Capt. Samuel Hood, then joined the Hudson's Bay Company as a first mate. During this time he embarked on an overland trek in quest of a copper mine, hoping also to learn the secret of the fabled Northwest Passage. He walked with his guide - Matonabbee - for 3,500 miles, fighting weather, starvation and culture shock only to witness an horrific massacre at the mouth of the Coppermine River. His discoveries and minute observations were later written up by him in his "A Journey to the Northern Ocean". McGoogan concludes his overview by making a case that Hearne's encounter with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, after his retirement and return to London, was the inspiration for the poet's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner".
Click here to order

$25
60431
Mawer, Granville Allen
South by Northwest The Magnetic Crusade and the Contest for Antarctica
Wakefield Press, Kent Town SA, 2006.
Small quarto; hardcover, with gilt spine and upper board titles and decorated endpapers; 319pp., with many monochrome illustrations. Minor wear. Near fine in like dustwrapper (now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film). For many, Antarctic history begins and ends with the race between Scott and Amundsen for the geographic south pole, but they were late to the start and only briefly on the course. By then, another polar race had already been in progress for seventy years, and it would continue for even longer. That race, for the South Magnetic Pole, was a marathon rather than a sprint and its starting point was suitably distant from Antarctica in the ice of the fabled Northwest Passage. The Magnetic Pole eluded the rival French, American and British expeditions sent to find it in 1840-41. It also defeated their successors - Shackleton and Mawson at the turn of the century. Not until 1986 did Australian scientists succeed, and only then by literally running it down. Along the way the magneticians collectively unveiled much of Greater Antarctica, but their achievements were blighted by bitter controversies about who first saw what.
Click here to order

$28
97670
Mountevans, Admiral Lord
Adventurous Life The Long-awaited Autobiography
Hutchinson & Co. (Publishers) Ltd., London. nd. (c.1947).
First edition: octavo; hardcover, with gilt spine titling; 259pp., with a monochrome portrait frontispiece and 15pp. of plates likewise. Moderate wear; somewhat shaken; softening to the spine extremities; a small hole in the cloth of the upper board; text block edges toned and spotted and top edge dusted; mild offset to the endpapers; scattered foxing throughout. Dustwrapper is well-rubbed and edgeworn; light chipping to the edges, especially the spine panel extremities, with associated creasing; a hole to the bottom edge of the front panel; now backed by archival-quality white paper and professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good. A Royal Navy officer, Evans was seconded from the Navy to the Discovery expedition to Antarctica in 1901-1904, when he served on the crew of the relief ship, and afterwards began planning his own Antarctic expedition. However, he suspended this plan when offered the post of second-in-command on Robert Falcon Scott's ill-fated Terra Nova expedition to the South Pole in 1910-1913, as captain of the expedition ship Terra Nova. He accompanied Scott to within 150 miles of the Pole, but was sent back in command of the last supporting party. On the return he became seriously ill with scurvy and only narrowly survived. Subsequently he returned to his naval duties and during the first World War distinguished himself in the Battle of Dover Strait.
Click here to order

$30
78119
Niven, Jennifer
The Ice Master The Doomed 1913 Voyage of the Karluk
Macmillan Books/Macmillan Publishers Ltd., London, 2000.
Octavo; hardcover, with gilt spine titling and endpaper maps; 402pp., with 16pp. of monochrome photographic plates. Text block and page edges lightly toned; else near fine in like dustwrapper (now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film). It was to be the greatest and most elaborate Arctic expedition in history, with the largest scientific staff ever taken on such a journey. Its leader, Vilhjalmur Stefansson, was celebrated for his studies of Eskimo life and, with this mission, hoped to find evidence that proved his staunchly held belief that there was a last unexplored continent, hidden beneath the vast polar ice cap. In June 1913, the H.M.C.S. Karluk set sail from the Esquimalt Naval Yard in Victoria, British Columbia. Six weeks later, the arctic winter had begun, the ship was imprisoned in ice and for five months the Karluk remained frozen, drifting farther and farther off course. In January 1914, with a thunderous impact, the ice tore a hole in the vessel's hull, and the redoubtable captain, Robert Bartlett, gave orders to abandon ship. With nothing but half the ship's store of supplies and the polar ice beneath their feet, Captain Bartlett, twenty-one men, an Inuit woman and her two small daughters, twenty-nine dogs, and one pet cat were now hopelessly shipwrecked in the middle of the Arctic Ocean, hundreds of miles from land. These castaways had no choice but to try to find solid ground where they could wait while they struggled against starvation, snow blindness, a gruesome and mysterious disease, exposure to the brutal winter - and each other. Bartlett and one member of the party soon set across the ice to seek help. Nine months later, twelve survivors were rescued by a small whaling schooner and brought back to civilization. The Ice Master is an epic tale of true adventure that rivals the most dramatic fiction. Drawing on the diaries of those who were rescued and those who perished, and even an interview with one living survivor, Jennifer Niven re-creates with astonishing accuracy and immediacy the Karluk's ill-fated journey and her crew's desperate attempts to find a way home from the icy wastes of the Arctic.
Click here to order

$20
58475
Ponting, Herbert & Frank Hurley
Antarctic Photographs 1910 - 1916 Scott, Mawson and Shackleton Expeditions
Macmillan, South Melbourne, Vic., Australia, 1979.
Oblong quarto; hardcover; 119pp. monochrome plates. Minor wear only; near fine in slightly discoloured dustwrapper. Herbert Ponting joined Scott's 1910 expedition and thus became the first 'camera-artist' of the Antarctic, gave the world its first authentic view of the southland terrain with its dazzling wildlife scenes. Frank Hurley went with Mawson's 1911-13 expedition to an unexplored part of the Antarctic continent, where more daunting conditions for the photographer could not be imagined. No subsequent work surpasses the pictures made by these two, notwithstanding the unsophisticated and primitive equipment in a most hostile environment.
Click here to order

$50
93315
Ponting, Herbert G.
The Great White South: Or With Scott in the Antarctic
Gerald Duckworth, London, 1950.
Reprint. Hardcover, octavo; blue boards with silver gilt spine titling and upper board motif; 299pp., monochrome plates. Moderate wear; boards spotted, frayed at edges and corners with faded and worn spine; offsetting to endpapers with some foxing to pastedown edges; toned and lightly spotted text block edges. Illustrated blue dustwrapper with missing segments on spine panel extremities, upper front edge and corners; spotting and rubbing especially to spine and rear panel; edges scraped creased chipped and worn with a few tiny tears. Good to very good with wrapper now protected in archival film and white paper backing.
Click here to order

$30
37748
Porter, Eliot
Antarctica
Hutchinson Group (Australia) Pty. Ltd., Melbourne, Vic., Australia, 1978.
Square quarto; hardcover, with upper board titling and endpaper maps; 168pp., many full-colour illustrations. Slightly scuffed lower board edges; lightly toned text block edges. Dustwrapper slightly browned and worn along edges; some chipping; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Otherwise very good.
Click here to order

$35
200279
Ralston, Kathleen
A Man for Antarctica The Early Life of Phillip Law
Hyland House, Melbourne, 1993.
Octavo hardcover; blue boards with gilt spine titling; illustrated diary entry endpapers; 236pp., monochrome plates. Very slightly rolled binding and spotting to text block edges. Very good and wrapper now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film with white paper backing. This is a biography of the noted physicist and leader of Antarctic exploration, Phillip Law, covering the years 1912 to 1954. The book ends with the voyage of the Kista Dan, which resulted in the setting up of Mawson, Australia's first permanent station on the Antarctic continent.
Click here to order

$22
64658
Riffenburgh, Beau
Racing with Death Douglas Mawson, Antarctic Explorer
Bloomsbury, London, 2008.
Octavo; hardcover; 296pp. Dustwrapper. Remainder. New. Shackleton's Forgotten Expedition is the story of Ernest Shackleton's epic journey toward the South Pole. Lacking funds and plagued by hunger, cruel weather, and unpredictable terrain, Shackleton and his party accomplished some of the most remarkable feats in the history of exploration. Not only were members of the expedition the first to climb the active volcano Mount Erebus and the first to reach the South Magnetic Pole, but Shackleton himself led a party of four that trudged hundreds of miles across uncharted wastelands and up to the terrible Antarctic Plateau to plant the Union Jack only ninety-seven miles from the South Pole itself. Based on extensive research and first-hand accounts Riffenburgh makes the expedition vivid while providing fascinating insight into the age of British exploration and Empire.
Click here to order

$20
89125
Riffenburgh, Beau
Shackleton's Forgotten Expedition: The Voyage of the Nimrod
Bloomsbury, New York, 2004.
First US edition. Hardcover, octavo; dark yellow boards with black spine titling, brown endpapers; 358pp., monochrome plates; notes, bibliography and index. Minor wear; mildly scuffed lower board edges and corners; one or two faint marks on upper text block edges. Near fine in like dustwrapper (now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film). Shackleton's Forgotten Expedition is the story of Ernest Shackleton's epic journey toward the South Pole. Lacking funds and plagued by hunger, cruel weather, and unpredictable terrain, Shackleton and his party accomplished some of the most remarkable feats in the history of exploration. Not only were members of the expedition the first to climb the active volcano Mount Erebus and the first to reach the South Magnetic Pole, but Shackleton himself led a party of four that trudged hundreds of miles across uncharted wastelands and up to the terrible Antarctic Plateau to plant the Union Jack only ninety-seven miles from the South Pole itself. Based on extensive research and first-hand accounts Riffenburgh makes the expedition vivid while providing fascinating insight into the age of British exploration and Empire. Beau Riffenburgh is a historian specializing in exploration. A native of California, he earned his doctorate at the Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, where he is currently the editor of Polar Record.
Click here to order

$28
201822
[Royal Geographical Society & The Scott Polar Research Institute] (Herbert Ponting, illus.; foreword by Sir Ranulph Fiennes)
With Scott to the Pole The "Terra Nova" Expedition 1910-1913; The Photographs of Herbert Ponting
Allen & Unwin, Crow's Nest NSW, 2004.
Quarto; hardcover, with silver-gilt spine titles and decorative endpapers; 240pp., with many monochrome illustrations. Minor wear; slightly shaken. Dustwrapper is lightly rubbed; now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. Very good to near fine.
Click here to order

$50
99010
Savours, Ann
The Voyages of the Discovery: The Illustrated History of Scott's Ship
Chatham Publishing, London, 2001.
Quarto hardcover; blue boards with gilt spine titling; 160pp., colour and monochrome illustrations. Minor wear only; near fine in like dustwrapper now professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. "Oceanographic committees now commonly refer to vessels as 'research platforms'. Indeed, some do resemble cluttered railway platforms and inspire as much affection. The role which a ship can have in inspiring the scientists who sail in her seems to have been forgotten. This meticulously researched book about one of the most famous of research vessels is a timely reminder to management of the not altogether unimportant role of ethos in science, and of the key role that Antarctic logistics play in enabling science. The Discovery, a steam barque, was built massively in wood expressly for Scott's first venture to the Antarctic by Dundee shipbuilders experienced in providing vessels for polar work. She served both as the logistical work-horse and as winter quarters for the expedition. After this she was bought by the Hudson's Bay Company for use in the Arctic fur trade and with a war-time interlude in which she sailed south again in an aborted attempt to rescue Shackleton's men on Elephant Island, flew its flag until 1922." The ship was then used for oceanographic research. "Her last voyage south was with the Antarctic Research Expedition under Sir Douglas Mawson. After a spell berthed in the Thames as a training ship for Sea Scouts she was transferred back to Dundee where she now rests in honoured retirement. With this splendid book, which was awarded a Special Merit Prize from the King George's Fund for Sailors, Ann Savours has put Antarctic and maritime enthusiasts in her debt, not least for the fine collection of rarely seen illustrations which it presents." - G.E. Fogg
Click here to order

$30
200055
Scott, Captain R.F., & Dr. E.A. Wilson (Leonard Huxley, ed.; Preface by Sir Clements R. Markham)
Scott's Last Expedition - Two Volumes. Vol I. being the Journals of Captain R.F. Scott, R.N., C.V.O. Vol II. being the Reports of the Journeys and the Scientific Work undertaken by Dr. E.A. Wilson and the Surviving Members of the Expedition.
Smith Elder & Co. Ltd., London, 1913.
First edition: two volumes, octavo; hardcover, with gilt spine and upper board titles and rules and blind rules to the upper boards; 1,209pp. [xxvipp. + 633pp. + xvipp. + 534pp.], untrimmed, top edges gilt, with two monochrome portrait frontispieces, 2 folding panoramas, 3 double-page plates and 181 plates likewise, plus 8 maps (6 folding and 1 in colour), 18 colour plates and 2 black-and-white illustrations. Moderate wear; both volumes shaken; spine extremities softened; spine of Volume I cracked; spines sunned with some chipping to Volume I; boards lightly rubbed with some mild sunning; text block edges spotted; mild offset to the endpapers; previous owner's name in ink to the flyleaves. No dustwrappers. Very good. "Scott's legacy has been buffered to and fro like the Antarctic wind over the past 100 years. In the aftermath of his death, which was not known about back home for almost another year, he was hailed as a hero by a declining Empire desperately in need of one. In later years, he has been traduced as an incompetent, indecisive amateur. Somewhere between the two, a middle ground can be found, emphasising his team's scientific discoveries and the extreme conditions they faced, without either condemning or cheerleading. Regardless, it is difficult not to feel a small Edwardian lump rising at the back of your throat when you read one of the final diary entries: 'Had we lived, I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance, and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman. These rough notes and our dead bodies must tell the tale.'" - Iain Hollingshead
Click here to order

$800
201752
Smith, Michael
I am Just Going Outside Captain Oates - Antarctic Tragedy
Spellmount Ltd., Staplehurst Kent UK, 2002.
Quarto; hardcover, with gilt spine titles; 301pp., with many monochrome illustrations. Mild wear; very slightly rolled. Dustwrapper lightly edgeworn. Very good. Exhaustively researched from new material, including major revelations involving his previously unknown and secret private life. Lawrence Edward Grace 'Titus' Oates was a dashing cavalry officer and hero in the Boer War, a successful jockey and paid 1,000 pounds to join Scott's doomed South Pole expedition, before becoming a national hero for sacrificing himself to save his comrades. There is fresh analysis of his military career, both as hero in the Boer War, where he was denied a VC, and later in Ireland. The book offers a different perspective from the traditional myth of Scott's heroic failure and Oates' suicide. It examines Oates' private life and role of his austere mother, who continued to control his memory long after his death, especially by ordering the destruction of his letters and diaries, which she had kept hidden, from her deathbed, and previously thought to have been destroyed. It is beautifully illustrated with maps and photographs, many previously unpublished.
Click here to order

$40
37747
Stonehouse, Bernard
North Pole South Pole A Guide to the Ecology and Resources of the Arctic and Antarctic
Prion, London, 1990.
Quarto. Hardcover, 216pp., colour illustrations. Minor wear only; near fine in like dustwrapper. "As a young ecologist" says Bernard Stonehouse, "I spent most of my time in the Antarctic. Not until my middle years did I discover the Arctic. It was rather like discovering the opposite sex". So Stonehouse begins his discussion of the polar extremes of the planet. This is a complex and wonderful catalogue of the differences that define the two poles and the similarities which unite them. Stonehouse is passionate about what these two savage environments mean for the planet and what they mean to us as a species. There are treasures to be gained, he says, but there are dangers involved and prices to pay for thoughtless exploitation.
Click here to order

$25
99527
Wilkinson, Alec
The Ice Balloon A.A. Andree and the Heroic Age of Arctic Exploration
Alfred Knopf, New York, 2011.
Octavo; hardcover, quarter-bound in papered boards with silver-gilt spine titles; 239pp., with many monochrome illustrations. Dustwrapper. Remainder. New. In this grand and astonishing tale, Alec Wilkinson brings us the story of S. A. Andree, the visionary Swedish aeronaut who, in 1897, during the great age of Arctic endeavour, left to discover the North Pole by flying to it in a hydrogen balloon. Called by a British military officer - the most original and remarkable attempt ever made in Arctic exploration - Andree's expedition was followed by nearly the entire world, and it made him an international legend. "The Ice Balloon" begins in the late nineteenth century, when nations, compelled by vanity, commerce, and science, competed with one another for the greatest discoveries, and newspapers covered every journey. Wilkinson describes how in Andree several contemporary themes intersected. He was the first modern explorer: the first to depart for the Arctic unencumbered by notions of the Romantic age, and the first to be equipped with the newest technologies. No explorer had ever left with more uncertainty regarding his fate, since none had ever flown over the horizon and into the forbidding region of ice. In addition to portraying the period, "The Ice Balloon" gives us a brief history of the exploration of the northern polar regions, both myth and fact, including detailed versions of the two record-setting expeditions just prior to Andree's - one led by U.S. Army lieutenant Adolphus Greely from Ellesmere Island; the other by Fridtjof Nansen, the Norwegian explorer who initially sought to reach the pole by embedding his ship in the pack ice and drifting toward it with the current. Woven throughout is Andree's own history, and how he came by his brave and singular idea. We also get to know Andree's family, the woman who loves him, and the two men who accompany him - Nils Strindberg, a cousin of the famous playwright, with a tender love affair of his own, and Knut Fraenkel, a willing and hearty young man. Andree's flight and the journey, based on the expedition's diaries and photographs, dramatically recovered thirty-three years after the balloon came down, along with Wilkinson's research, provide a book filled with suspense and adventure, a haunting story of high ambition and courage, made tangible with the detail, beauty, and devastating conditions of travelling and dwelling in "the realm of Death," as one Arctic explorer put it.
Click here to order

$20