lamdha books -
Catalogue of books on the Blue Mountains

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97753
Allen, Alfred (Jim Smith, ed.)
A Correct & Faithful Account of a Journey to the "Fish River Caves" by the "Pickwick Corresponding Club" in 1886
Den Fenella Press, Wentworth Falls NSW, 2012.
Quarto; paperback; 78pp., with many colour and monochrome illustrations. New. In 1886 seven members of Australia's own 'Pickwick Corresponding Club' set out to walk the then uncompleted 46 km bridle track between Katoomba and Jenolan Caves. After a stay of several days they walked back to Katoomba. The track they followed later became well known as the Six Foot Track. The club members adopted the names of their favourite characters from Charles Dickens's Pickwick Papers and the three young ladies of the party became the first women to walk the track (two of them later became prominent feminists). Alfred Allen, the leader of the group and a well-known and controversial member of the Quakers, styled himself Samuel Pickwick. The family members and friends accompanying him adopted the following names from Dickens's book: Nathaniel Winkle, Tracey Tupman, Samuel Weller, Mrs Bardell, Aunt Rachael, and Arabella Allan. Alfred Allen's full diary of this trip, illustrated with his many drawings and photographs is published in this book for the first time, together with a detailed commentary by Blue Mountains' historian Dr Jim Smith. The diary includes many humorous references comparing the adventures of the Australian Pickwick Corresponding Club with those of Charles Dickens's characters. Alfred Allen's photographs were the first to be taken of people walking, picnicking and camping on the track. The interior and exterior photographs of Jenolan Caves are of considerable historical importance. The detailed descriptions of the party's stay at Jenolan Caves house, their cave tours and meetings with the cave guides, including the eccentric Jeremiah Wilson, provide a detailed account of what it was like to visit Jenolan Caves 125 years ago.
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$30
58339
Barrett, Jim
Cox's River Discovery, History and Development.
Neville Bush Holdings, Glenbrook, NSW, Australia, 2009.
Octavo; paperback; 117pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. Whilst outlining the history of the Kowmung River and the Burragorang region, author Jim Barrett realised that there was a need to document the history of the Cox's River into which drain three of the major rivers of the Blue Mountains area. The river and its valley were discovered by Blaxland during his trek over the Blue Mountains, but for various reasons, it was named after William Cox who built the road in his footsteps, much to Blaxland's chagrin. Barrett takes us from this point through the development of the surrounding region, noting its uses under indigenous husbanding and then during European occupation up until today. This includes the extensive flooding which was instigated in 1958 by the Sydney Water Board during the construction of the Waragamba Dam.
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$15
60300
Barrett, Jim
The First Bushwalker The Story of Fred Eden
Jim Barrett, Glenbrook, NSW, Australia, 1996.
Octavo; paperback; 90pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. Fred Eden was a British citizen who arrived in Australia in 1889. For twenty-five years he walked widely around the country particularly the Eastern coastal regions, South Australia and Tasmania, before settling in the Blue Mountains in the early 1900s. During his walks he kept extensive journals of his experiences, only a few of which have, unfortunately, survived. Jim Barrett edits his way through this material to highlight the adventures of this pioneering bushwalker. Fred Eden left Australia to administer his mother's estates in Switzerland and died in 1948, and wasn't able to get back to this country; nevertheless he left a fascinating legacy in his footsteps.
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$15
89241
Barrett, Jim
Gandanguurra: The Language of the Mountain People... and beyond
Neville Bush Holdings, Glenbrook NSW, 2015.
Quarto paperback, 131pp., monochrome illustrations. New. " 'I am always sorry when any language is lost, because language is the pedigree of nations.' This quote, attributed to Samuel Johnson during a tour of the Hebrides, occurred about the same time as the first real British contact with the Australian Aborigine - at the Endeavour River in northern Queensland in 1770. Cook's party then recorded the first Australian Aboriginal words, including 'gangurru' (kangaroo). When Governor Phillip arrived in Australia he brought with him the Aboriginal word lists collected by Cook's party. At this time it was assumed that there was only one Australian language. The early Sydney settlers used the Endeavour River words in conversation with the local people around Sydney Harbour who knew the kangaroo as 'buurruu' and, as a result, the local natives thought that 'kangaroo' was the English word for their 'buurruu'. In fact the number of Australian languages was considerable, such as in New South Wales where there were probably about forty. Sadly, in this state where the collision between white settler and Aboriginal dweller was the most disruptive, the ancient languages are now virtually extinct... No adjective could adequately describe the enormous difference between the growth of English and Gandanguurra in terms of their vocabularies. The Oxford English Dictionary has over 60,000 entries; Gandanguurra - like other Australian languages - is believed to have a vocabulary of about 10,000 words. Furthermore, Gandanguurra (like its neighbours) suffers a consistent loss of words through the practice of taboo-ing the name of a person who dies..." - from the Preface.
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$25
42445
Barrett, Jim
Kanangra Walls Discovery and History
Neville Bush Holdings, Glenbrook NSW, 2009.
Octavo; paperback; 58pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. Adding his voice to an ever-increasing community of people who claim that the Kanangra Walls are the most spectacular landscape in the country, Jim Barrett laments the fact that, despite being only a short drive from Sydney, the region is most often overlooked by visitors to the Blue Mountains. In this booklet he outlines the discovery of the area and reproduces some of the earliest maps of the Walls region, along with a plethora of photographs from across the years. From there he discusses walking trails and points of access to the Kanangra Walls, in the hope that it won't be the Blue Mountains' "forgotten destination" for too much longer.
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$15
60301
Barrett, Jim
The Kills of Kedumba The Story of a Blue Mountains Pioneering Family
Neville Bush Holdings, Glenbrook NSW, 2008.
Octavo; paperback; 54pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. In 2005, Jim Barrett visited the area where settler George Kill built his farm on the banks of the Cox's River. Since 1960 and the flooding of the Warragamba Dam catchment area, only members of the Sydney Water Catchment Area (SCA) are allowed within the three kilometre exclusion zone promoted by the Authority. Accompanying George Kill's modern-day descendants, Barrett was chosen to document the settling and development of the region, instigated and largely led by the Kill family. George Kill emigrated to Australia from England in 1893; in 1900, he married Mary Ann Hunt, herself a descendant of the earliest convict settlers of the Burragorang district, and they retired to the Kill landholding to begin their married life. That life was documented by George in a journal which has become known as the "Kill Diary" and which forms the guide and the key to Barrett's investigation of the life and progress of the family. Needless to say, that lifestyle was hard in the extreme, a subsistence living which involved grubbing for cedar and droving bullocks through the harsh terrain. Including a short history of the Kedumba Valley, this story is a fascinating glimpse into the lives of the earliest Blue Mountains settlers.
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$15
58340
Barrett, Jim
Kowmung River Discovery, History and Development
Neville Bush Holdings, Glenbrook, NSW, Australia, 2009.
Octavo; paperback; 86pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. The Kowmung river has its start south of the Jenolan Caves area where it traverses wild and rugged country, passing through plateaus of over 4,000 feet in height before joining Cox's River at its headwaters. The first white man to see the Kowmung was Francis Barralier in 1802, followed by George Caley in 1806; but it wasn't until 1833 that W.R. Govett finally succeeded in surveying the entire area, including the Kowmung, especially the lower 24 mile stretch. Aboriginal assistants to these exploring parties have contributed to some confusion regarding the naming of the river, but then again, none of the early mappers were accompanied by the local Gundunggurra tribespeople for whom the river is known as the Barnalay. In 1833, H.C. White named the river Kowmung after questioning his Dharug and Tharawal guides, and this name may have been either their own term for what the Gunduggura called Barnalay, or their own tribal word for the Cox: the real reason is lost in time. In the years since then, the river has been the site of cattle speculation and various attempts to forge stock routes; the logging range of cedar cutters; and the location of limestone mines. Nowadays it is best known for its spectacular bushwalking possibilities, most of which are attempted only by the very experienced.
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$15
57840
Barrett, Jim
Narrow Neck and the Birth of Katoomba
Jim Barrett, Glenbrook, NSW, Australia, 1996.
Octavo; paperback; 64pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. Prior to 1874 there was nothing at Katoomba except for a railway siding known as "The Crushers", after the rock crushing equipment that was situated nearby. In the period 1879 to the late 1880s, John Britty North, a local engineer, made an extensive survey of the landforms which comprised Orphan Rock and Narrow Neck, and found deposits of shale oil and coal beneath them which opened up the possibility of profitable industry in the region. In this evaluation, Barrett makes the claim that without this early mining endeavour, Katoomba might not have risen to the prominence that it enjoys to this day, citing such developments as the Scenic Railway, which grew out of the old shale coal transport bucket system used to bring the ore up from the valley floor. This is an insightful short history of the town which links its foundation and development to the presence of those early mines and the people who worked them.
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$15
42446
Barrett, Jim
Shack Country ... and The Old Burragorang
Guntawang Catholic Youth Centres, Emu Plains, NSW, Australia, 2009.
Octavo; paperback; 80pp., with maps and monochrome illustrations. New. For some 150 years, from the 1820s to the 1950s, the Burragorang Valley lay in idyllic solitude, virtually on the outskirts of Sydney. Part One of this book is the story of five priests from Sydney who acquired Kiaramba, 174 acres on Scott's Main Range, in 1940 and who built a shack there as a retreat from their parochial duties. The flooding of the Burragorang as part of the Warragamba scheme seemed to spell the demise of Kiaramba, but the emergence of the Catholic Bushwalking Club gave it new life. Part Two is a nostalgic look back on the Old Burragorang.
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$15
61562
Barrett, Jim
Through the Years with the Catholic Bushwalking Club
Catholic Bushwalking Club, Strathfield, NSW, Australia, 2008.
Quarto; paperback; 114pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. The Catholic Bushwalking Club (CBC) was established at the end of the Second World War as a community and pastoral organisation under the oversight of an appointed chaplain. Under the direction of its Walks Secretaries (including, at one time, the author), much exploration of the surrounding bushland was undertaken with an aim to training club members in the skills of endurance, confidence, self-reliance and leadership. The range of exploration and trekking that the Club has undertaken is faithfully recorded by Barrett in these pages, showing the dedication and doggedness of the CBC members over some unforgiving and downright unfriendly terrain.
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$15
79133
Cameron, Bruce
A History of the Blue Labyrinth: second edition Blue Mountains National Park
The author, Sun Valley, NSW, Australia, 2014.
Quarto; hardcover, with illustrated boards; 352pp., with many monochrome and full-colour illustrations. No dustwrapper as issued. New. "As we destroy our bush land environment we destroy just so much of ourselves. The balance of Nature is finely adjusted; upset it, and there will a desert on our doors. All the glory of the canyons, caves and rolling plateaus of our great Blue Mountains is not nearly so much a commercial asset as it is Nature's Heritage for legitimate enjoyment, and our own gift to posterity." - Katoomba Daily, 1934. From this prescient statement the current volume springboards its history of the Blue Mountains National Park, covering all aspects of the establishment and development of the "Blue Labyrinth" from the earliest days. Anyone interested in the history of the region should think of this work - now in a new updated edition - as their first port of call.
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$65
85501
Goldney, David
Cox's Road Dreaming Guide Book A Natural History of Cox's 1814/15 Road - Australia's First Inland European Road
Land and Property, Bathurst, 2015.
Quarto; paperback; 96pp., with many colour and monochrome illustrations, and eight maps on three separate fold-out sheets in a plastic envelope. New. In the years 1814 to 1815, Lt. William Cox pushed a road across the Blue Mountains in the wake of Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth's controversial traversing of the "impenetrable" barrier. In doing so, he created the first European inland road in Australia, and set the scene for those about to follow. In this work, David Goldney turns a gimlet eye on all things to do with Cox's Road, creating for readers a broad tapestry of investigation. Nothing escapes him: scenic and historical sites; museums and galleries; areas of importance to the land's traditional owners; and the ranges of some well-known wildlife. If they lie along the line from the Flag Staff on the Macquarie River to Emu Ford on the Nepean, it will be mentioned in this book and its eight accompanying maps - along with map co-ordinates and estimated travel times. And if that wasn't enough, the material is all backed up by a website providing updated and further information. This is Cox's Road Dreaming indeed!
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$35
79132
Hallinan, Mark
Jenolan Caves The Complete Guide
Critical Concepts, Brisbane, Qld., Australia, 2013.
Quarto; hardcover, with illustrated boards and endpaper maps; 268pp., with many monochrome and full-colour illustrations. No dustwrapper, as issued. New. The Jenolan Caves complex is not particularly well-known outside of Australia; however, it is a world-class limestone formation on a par with anything on offer elsewhere in the world. Along with the crystalline brilliance of stalactites and stalagmites are an abundance of curtain and pillar formations in a veritable labyrinth of caves, some of which yet remain unexplored. All of this geological magic is presented against a colourfully historic backdrop involving Aboriginal culture, horse and cattle rustlers from the earliest days of white settlement, and of course the revelations of the first European explorers and entrepreneurs, determined to unearth Jenolan's secrets and present them to the wider public. However, the true history of the area begins over 40 million years ago with the creation of the caves from an extensive southern ocean and the development and evolution of the natural environment which still flourishes in the bushland surrounds to this day. All of this fascinating knowledge is presented in this mammoth undertaking, the veritable 'final word' on the Jenolan Caves.
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$65
77921
Hertog, Sonja den (ed.)
Walking the Valley - Sydney Speleological Society Occasional Paper, No. 11 An Oral Record of Caving and Bushwalking in the Burragorang and Beyond, during the 1930s
The Sydney Speleogical Society, Broadway, NSW, Australia, 1994.
Octavo; staple-sewn booklet with illustrated wrappers; 62pp., with maps and black & white photographic illustrations. New. This paper from the Sydney Speleological Society (SSS) is almost unique in that it contains no caving information at all; rather, it discusses exploration and hiking through the Kowmung River region and Burragorang Valley region of the Blue Mountains area in NSW, areas often trekked through en route to caving sites. In this work Sonja den Hertog has edited the transcriptions of oral statements provided to fellow Society member Ron Mills, turning these reminiscences into a highly readable overview of the sometimes harrowing journeys these long-time bushwalkers undertook in the early days of settlement in the area. Although the Burragorang Valley has been flooded to form the Waragamba Dam, the Kowmung River Valley and other wildernesses mentioned in this work are still undeveloped and as wild as they were back in the 1930s, progress through them - to known caving and other speleological sites - is still daunting; thus this guide might be seen as a veiled warning to those who would cross this wilderness to reach caving adventures!
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$16
76854
Jones, Gil
Wasteland Wilderness Wonderland Getting to Know Sydney's Sandstone Country
Blue Mountain Education and Research Trust, Lawson NSW, 2013.
Quarto; paperback; 140pp., with maps and colour and monochrome illustrations. New. 'Sydney's sandstone is here explored by Gil Jones as a geologist, historian, poet and, above all, lover. Is it Wasteland, Wilderness or Wonderland?' - Eugene Stockton. This is local history literally from the ground up: Gil Jones describes the geomorphology of Sydney - essentially a huge bowl of sandstone extending north to Newcastle, south to the Illawarra escarpment and as far west as Lithgow - and examines its impact upon all aspects of the environment which it underpins. This sweeping analysis looks at the evolution of the flora, fauna and local weather systems and also encompasses the human impacts, from the activities of the indigenous caretakers to the ravages of those who brought about their disenfranchisement.
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$25
85006
Knapman, Leonie
Glen Davis in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales A Shale Oil Ghost Town and its People 1938-1954
Halstead Press, Ultimo, NSW, Australia, 2010.
Quarto; hardcover, with illustrated boards and endpaper maps; 270pp., with full-colour and monochrome photographic illustrations. New. The town of Glen Davis nowadays is a ruin, a ghost town nestled and forgotten within the remote Capertee Valley. However, 60 years ago it was a bustling hive of activity, the home and livelihood of thousands of miners, industrial chemists, engineers and their families, and the businesses which supported their lifestyle. Built upon one of the richest oil-shale deposits in the world, Glen Davis was, at one time, the backbone of Australia's pioneering industrial infrastructure. Over time though, federal policy shifted and pushed the town into the shadows; wartime restrictions and rationing brought the death knell and the settlement was abandoned by those who felt that they had been as equally abandoned by the economic counsellors of their day. This is the complete history - social, industrial and political - of this lost town by someone who knew the place and grew up there as one of its citizens.
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$50
205515
Knox, Kelvin, & Eugene Stockton (eds.)
Aboriginal Heritage of the Blue Mountains Recent Research and Reflections
Blue Mountains Education and Research Trust, Lawson NSW, 2019.
Quarto; paperback; 256pp., with maps and many monochrome and full-colour illustrations. New. People have inhabited Australia for thousands of years. At the foot of the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, human occupation is dated at up to 50,000 years ago. In 1788, the way of life for Aboriginal people living in the Mountains irrevocably changed. However, their cultural heritage, handed down from ancient generations, has remained in the form of occupation sites, art, artefacts, axe-grinding grooves, scarred trees, stone arrangements and other physical traces of their presence in the landscape. "Aboriginal Heritage of the Blue Mountains" gathers together some new research, stories and reflections about the Mountains' Aboriginal inhabitants and their heritage, perhaps what could now be understood as Australia's shared heritage.
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$50
10592
Macqueen, Andy
Back from the Brink: second edition Blue Gum Forest and the Grose Wilderness
The author, 1997.
Quarto paperback, 347pp, monochrome illustrations. New. The forest stands as the Cradle of Conservation in New South Wales. This is its story from when it was first reserved in 1875 as a national spectacle, the threats to its existence and those who have preserved and been part of it.
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$40
11199
Macqueen, Andy
Somewhat Perilous The journeys of Singleton, Parr, Howe, Myles & Blaxland in the Northern Blue Mountains
Andy Macqueen, Wentworth Falls, NSW, Australia, 2004.
Quarto; paperback; 192pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. After crossing the Blue Mountains, explorers set out to find other approaches not only to the far side but to northern expansions of the white settlement, to Windsor, north to the Hunter Valley, and to the opening territories around Newcastle. In this work, Macqueen provides a full transcript of the explorers' journals and letters and determines a range of facts which overturn several previously-held notions, while simultaneously shedding light on some heretofore unconsidered material, including indigenous burning regimes and bushfire maintenance. This is a thoughtfully-considered study, penned by a descendant of the men involved in this "somewhat perilous" undertaking.
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$30
98352
Macqueen, Andy
Wayfaring in the Wollemi Stories of people in wilderness
Andy Macqueen, Wentworth Falls NSW, 2017.
Quarto; hardcover, with illustrated boards and endpaper maps; 352pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. No dustwrapper, as issued. New. Wayfaring in Wollemi celebrates the human side of wilderness. It presents the stories of 28 people: colonial explorers and surveyors, wanderers, cattlemen, would-be developers, adventurers and conservationists. For one reason or another they each spent a part of their life in the Wollemi, the largest declared Wilderness in New South Wales. What took them there and what did they get up to? Did the experience change their lives? In telling their stories, the author follows their footsteps through the gorges, over the mountains and into the hideaways. Along the way he weaves some of his personal story, revealing how he, like many of his subjects, has been touched by a landscape largely unaffected by transient modern society
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$40
202527
Martyn, John
Rocks and Trees A photographic journey through the rich and varied geology, scenery and flora of the Sydney region
STEP Inc., Turramurra NSW, 2018.
Quarto; hardcover, with illustrated boards and endpapers; 311pp., with many full-colour illustrations. No dustwrapper as issued. New. The perfect way to learn about the geology that underpins the landscape and diverse flora of the Sydney region, "Rocks and Trees" captures the dramatic scenery of the Greater Blue Mountains, the beauty of the coastline and the great sweep of plains west of the CBD; but its main purpose is to highlight the geology and flora and their interrelationships. The book journeys from the Illawarra along the coast to Newcastle and inland to the Greater Blue Mountains, staying within the framework created by the massive sandstones and conglomerates of the Triassic Narrabeen Group.
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$50
58915
Pembroke, Michael (Libby Raines, illus.)
Trees of History and Romance - signed Essays from a Mount Wilson Garden
Bloomings Books Pty. Ltd., Melbourne, Vic. Australia, 2013.
Third edition: octavo; hardcover; 266pp., with many duotone illustrations. Dustwrapper professionally protected by superior non-adhesive polypropylene film. New. The author's subjects are the deciduous trees and conifers thriving in the cool-climate, basalt soil and altitude of Mount Wilson. He draws from history, literature, poetry, mythology, botany, and folklore to meditate upon a deeply felt connection with the land and its nature.
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$40
60765
Ralston, Basil
The Men of Jenolan Caves: third revised edition 1838-1964
Sydney Speleological Society, Broadway, NSW, Australia, 2010.
Quarto; paperback; 82pp., with many maps and monochrome illustrations. New. This is the story of the men who explored, guided and helped with the development of the Jenolan Caves in the Blue Mountains. Officially discovered in 1838, some question remains as to whether this complex of limestone caverns was encountered by earlier European visitors with the distinct possibility that it may have served as a hideout for bushrangers. Of course, indigenous explorers have known about the caves for a longer period than that, but this is not the scope of the present work: rather, it looks at the custodial and exploratory services rendered by scientific and community-minded individuals who took upon themselves the task of mapping, examining and preserving the complex for the benefit of all comers. Basil Ralston was uniquely able to provide this perspective as a long-time guide, conservator and explorer of the caves. Within these pages are many photographs and reproduced documents revealing everything from great moments of discovery to the tourist paraphernalia generated by the site over the years. This revised third edition expands the older versions with new scientific material and more photographs, some never before published.
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$28
204738
Smith, Jim
The Aboriginal People of the Burragorang Valley: revised, second edition "If we left the Valley our hearts would break"
Blue Mountains Education and Research Trust (BMERT), Lawson NSW, 2018.
Revised and expanded: Quarto; paperback; 340pp., with maps, 198 full-colour and monochrome illustrations and index. New. "Burragorang Valley is unlike any other place in Australia. Every part of Aboriginal land was touched by invasion, and Gundungurra Country was no different. Some areas experienced violent conflict, or were almost immediately wiped out by sicknesses that native immune systems could not cope with. Some communities were flushed out by sending Aboriginal people to missions and alternate settlements to make way for 'progress' and 'colonisation'. Burragorang was different, and this is what made the Valley so special. The black and white people lived together in relative harmony. The patchwork of my heritage is one of many colours, and I am proud of each and every black and white relative who lived and worked in the Valley. Jim Smith captures the beauty, and also the fiery will and perseverance of the Valley's people, living through some very tough times. Burragorang Valley bred strong and formidable, hard-working people who didn't want to leave the Valley as my family were forced to do when the Dam was built. On behalf of my family we would like to thank Jim Smith for the work he has done for us and for out community. His passion for research and conserving history has been such an asset and a privilege for us, as without his tireless effort, we would surely not have compiled such an extensive family and community history." - Taylor Clarke
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$50
208245
Smith, Jim
The Curiosity of Melbourne Ward and his Great Barrier Reef & Blue Mountains Museums Lindeman Island; Hydro Majestic - Medlow Bath; Echo Point - Katoomba
Den Fenella Press, Wentworth Falls NSW, 2019.
Quarto; paperback; 88pp., with many colour and monochrome illustrations. New. For over 20 years, an unassuming shed in the grounds of the Hydro Majestic hotel offered visitors access to one of Australia's greatest private collections of anthropological artefacts and biological specimens. Entering its dim interior, tourists would be greeted by the curator Melbourne Ward, a man as unusual as his eclectic assemblage. His 'Gallery of Natural History and Native Art' opened in 1943 and closed in 1965. A branch Museum at Echo Point called Pyala stayed open until 1972, being run by Mel's wife Halley after his death in 1966. This book relates the curious story of Mel Ward's life, including his early theatrical career, and recreates through photographs something of the experience of walking through his densely packed displays of arts and crafts from indigenous peoples in Australia, New Guinea, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. These were intermingled with stuffed and pickled fauna and Australian convict and colonial era artefacts. Mel was fascinated by the mythology and legends of tribal people and was the first to publicise widely the best-known version of the Aboriginal legend of the Three Sisters at Katoomba. Mel Ward's enthusiastic presentations and charismatic personality made a lifelong impression on those who were lucky enough to meet him.
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$25
42132
Stockton, Eugene & John Merriman (eds.)
Blue Mountains Dreaming - second edition The Aboriginal Heritage
Blue Mountains Education & Research Trust, Lawson, NSW, Australia, 2009.
Quarto; paperback; 256pp., with many maps and full-colour and monochrome illustrations. New. In 1788 the Aborigines of the Blue Mountains had had no contact with Europeans: within 30 years their traditional way of life had been irrevocably changed. Of the generations of new Mountains dwellers who followed, few appreciated the Aboriginal heritage of the region, even though evidence of their presence was known from the Nepean River and the adjacent escarpment. Increasingly however, widespread discoveries of art sites, occupation sites, stone tools, axe-grinding grooves and stone arrangements, research into the journals and early writings of European explorers and settlers, and the compilation of oral histories, are providing a rich, if incomplete, account of the traditional lifestyles and environment of the Gundungurra and Darug people. This greatly expanded second edition gathers together new information about the original inhabitants of the Blue Mountains and provides a fascinating account of histories, languages, legends and European contact.
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$42
81467
Stockton, Eugene (Ed.)
Sydney Rock On the Ways to the West; Hazelbrook - Lawson, NSW
Blue Mountain Education & Research Trust, Lawson, NSW, Australia, 2014.
Reprint: landscape octavo; paperback; 64pp., with maps and many full-colour and monochrome photographic illustrations. New. The Mid-Mountains ridge that defines the Linden to Lawson "Tortuous Ridge" is the site where the western-most edge of the Hawkesbury Sandstone outcropping gives over to the Narrabeen Sandstones and Shales of the Upper and Western Blue Mountains. The domed summit of this ridge - the eponymous Sydney Rock - forms the centre of an area containing many Aboriginal sites and probably served as a landmark for tribespeople pushing westwards into the hanging swamps and level territory beyond. In this work, Eugene Stockton catalogues the history and environmental features of the Rock, including his own childhood memories of using the site as a playground. Trainlines, highways and the changing years have bypassed Sydney Rock and left their scars; now Stockton makes a claim to its being the Blue Mountains' own Uluru and champions its preservation for posterity.
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$20